Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Dublin's advanced placement programs receive honor

By 
Dublin City Schools is one of 547 school districts in the U.S. and Canada to be honored by the College Board with placement on the 5th Annual Advanced Placement District Honor Roll for increasing access to AP course work and improving scores.

This is the second consecutive year that Dublin City Schools has earned this honor.

"We are extremely proud of this achievement," said Todd Hoadley, Dublin superintendent.

"It is remarkable for the 11th largest District in Ohio to be able to increase the number of students who take AP?exams while also increasing scores," Hoadley said.

According to the most recent Ohio Department of Education statistics, Dublin students took the most AP Exams in Ohio during the 2012-13 school year.

Reaching these goals indicates the district is successfully identifying motivated, academically prepared students who are likely to benefit from rigorous AP course work.

Since 2012, Dublin City Schools has increased the number of students participating in AP by 8 percent while improving the percentage of students earning AP Exam scores of 3 or higher by 1 percent.

The AP Exams take place in the spring and are scored on a 5.0 scale.

College credit may be earned for scores above a 3.

The exams can be taken in a variety of subjects, ranging from chemistry to European history.

In 2014, more than 3,800 colleges and universities throughout the world accepted AP scores for college credit, and/or took them into consideration during the admission process.

Thirty other Ohio school districts, such as Hilliard, Granville and New Albany, achieved this honor.

"The devoted teachers and administrators in this district are delivering an undeniable benefit to their students: opportunity," said Trevor Packer, the College Board's senior vice president of AP and instruction.

"When coupled with a student's hard work, such opportunities can have myriad outcomes, whether building confidence, learning to craft effective arguments, earning credit for college, or persisting to graduate from college on time," Packer said. "We applaud your conviction that a more diverse population of students is ready for the sort of rigor that will prepare them for success in college."

Helping more students learn at a higher level and earn better AP scores is an objective of all members of the community, from AP teachers to district and school administrators to college professors.

Many districts are experimenting with a variety of initiatives and strategies to determine how to simultaneously expand access and improve student performance.

Inclusion on the AP District Honor Roll is based on the examination of three years of AP data, from 2012 to 2014.


Districts must increase participation or access to AP by at least 4 percent in large districts, increase or maintain the percentage of exams taken by African American, Hispanic/ Latino, and American Indian/ Alaska Native students, and improve performance levels when comparing the percentage of students in 2014 scoring a 3 or higher to those in 2012.

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Deb's Details:
This was a pretty straight forward article to write because I had a press release to work off. I wanted to make the press release my own and so I tried to reword some things.
I think this article confirms that Dublin is a highly ranked district and they put a lot of emphasis on great academic achievement. Their students work very hard and are clearly performing very well on AP tests. I remember how hard those AP tests were so I think it says a lot that they are getting 4s and 5s.
I would've liked to have gotten a quote from a student in an AP class or an AP teacher at a high school.