Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Cinderella story continues for woman from Pataskala

Jordan Miracle, 20, from Pataskala, was initially crowned as the state runner-up in the Ohio Cinderella Woman pageant.
When the state winner -- Molly Thvedt, 21, from Westerville -- won the International Cinderella Woman title, her crown was passed to Miracle, the runner-up.
Miracle was officially crowned during an Ohio Cinderella Pageant coronation party held by the Ohio State Director for the Cinderella International Scholarship Pageant Judy Keyes Saturday, Aug. 15 in Westerville.
Miracle attended the International Cinderella Pageant in Dallas July 20-24 and she said when she saw Thvedt win, she was so happy for her that she didn't immediately realize what it meant.
"Judy came up to me after Molly won and asked if I knew what this meant," Miracle said.
"She explained to me that now I was the state winner and I was so excited," she said. "I called my mom and we cried together."
The Ohio Cinderella Scholarship Pageant was the third pageant Miracle entered. She was in her first pageant in fifth grade and won the Miss Congeniality award.
"This pageant and what I have accomplished so far has meant so much to me," Miracle said. "Judy is so amazing and I wouldn't have accomplished what I have without her."
Last year, Katie Carson, a 7-year-old from Upper Arlington, won International Tot and Sarah Grooms, from Blacklick, won International Cinderella Woman in 2007.
Additionally, Angela Escobar, from Reynoldsburg, won first alternate as International Cinderella Woman in 2015.
As the new Ohio Cinderella Woman, Miracle will travel with other winners, meeting girls and participating in parades.
Miracle works for Chase Bank and is taking online classes through Strayer University, studying education because she wants to be an elementary school teacher.
"I love kids and love being the one that they look up to," she said.
"All of my friends are out partying and I'm not like that," Miracle said.
"I love my family and want to cultivate stronger relationships with them."
Keyes said Cinderella pageant winners and contestants have created a successful legacy, such as start their own charity groups, joining a band or even becoming a Radio City Music Hall Rockette.
"It's a great program because it is not just a beauty pageant," Keyes said. "This is not 'Toddlers and Tiaras' like you see on TV. It's not superficial and half of the girl's score comes from their performing art talent."
Girls may perform a 2 1/2-minute talent routine demonstrating their skills in drama, vocal, dance, instrumental, gymnastics or baton.
"We are a youth development program," Keyes said.
"Our young ladies learn to handle themselves so well, are polite and speak eloquently," said. "They develop life skills that they can use in their future careers."
The Cinderella pageant also frowns upon girls wearing ornate clothing.
"It's vastly different than pageants that you see on TV. In other competitions, the girls are so catty and don't make friends because they are so competitive," Miracle said.
"The Cinderella pageants are so genuine. It's all about elegance, grace, carrying conversations with adults and making new friends."
The Cinderella Scholarship Pageant was founded in 1976 and is divided into five age categories: Tot (ages 3-6), Miniature Miss (ages 7-9), Miss (ages 10-12), Teen (ages 13-17) and Cinderella Woman (ages 18-26).